A Piece of Garlic can help you Sleep Well

here are numerous benefits of eating garlic throughout the day, but is it true that garlic helps sleep? The simple answer is “no” — not if you’re eating it in the evening with the intention of getting better rest throughout the night.

This doesn’t discount garlic’s importance to your daily diet. It’s known to be one of the most important vegetables on the planet— an amazing anti-inflammatory and antiviral agent that dates back as far as 2600 B.C.

Health experts have used it to treat major ailments including atherosclerosis, stroke, cancer, immune disorders, cerebral aging, arthritis, and cataract formation, but when it comes to sleep it’s not very helpful.

Garlic Before Bedtime Can Irritate Your Stomach
Garlic is a gastrointestinal stimulant, so you should avoid eating large amounts of it in the evening.. The veggie’s hot and spicy properties work to “intensify salivary flow and gastric juice secretion.” This effect can keep you rolling back and forth in bed at night.

WebMD goes even further to assert that people with stomach or digestion problems should think twice before eating it at all.

The secret to your success is to get the majority of your garlic intake during breakfast and/or lunch.

Why You Should Consider Garlic If You Snore
According to the Encyclopedia of Old Medicine, garlic has long been used to treat snoring disorders. It helps to dry up mucus membranes and open up airways, which in theory may be able to reduce chances of snoring and help you (and your loved one) sleep better.

This doesn’t mean you should take it before bedtime. Simply incorporate garlic into your daily eating habits or try taking it in caplet form — in the morning or around lunchtime.

The Power of Garlic
If your stomach can handle garlic, this SuperFood should be eaten regularly. By fueling your body with its nutrients, your cardiovascular and immune systems can operate more efficiently.

For best sleep patterns, you should consider eating the following SuperFoods: spinach, beans, walnuts, broccoli, pumpkin, avocado, tomato and salmon.